The February EMS Roundup

This month in EMS cyberspace:

The obvious big news (In my little corner of the Internet) was the launch of www.theemtspot.com! The traffic and feedback from the site has already been overwhelmingly positive and I think we’re off to a good start. In February we warned you about MRSA on your stethoscope, helped you classify and treat burn injuries, talked about the issues with hydrogen sulfide suicides and challenged you to let Patients Define Their Emergencies as well as rethinking the title EMT Basic.

Elsewhere in EMS Blogland, Peter Canning gives us Something to Ponder regarding trauma data collection, Sam the EMT readjusts her Plans and finds a new love of fire, and Paramedic Supermonkey gives us a look at what or Protocols should be.

At EMS1 Kelley Grayson asks us to reexamine The Cult of Mechanism and over at JEMS.comDoctor Bledsoe reminded us that good medicine can be found everywhere in Success in The Heartland.

My current favorite forum, EMT City got the fireworks going with a discussion about driving fire apparatus code 3 for training and kicked around some ideas regarding the craziest personal first responder kit you’ve ever seen assembled. And in the JEMS forums, Skip Kirkwood asked us to consider then notion of EMS branding.

If you like EMS podcasts, don’t miss the discussion about aeromedical safety at the EMS garage.

From the “glad I didn’t do that” file, Wicked Local Plympton reported on a fire departments lack of documentation of obvious death criteria in the death of a 16 year old girl. One unfortunate fire service put the fire out and left the body behind and IslandPacket.com investigated two Hilton Head paramedics questionable response to a man with an apparent closed head injury. Perhaps I’ll do a piece on combative head injuries in my March offerings.)

I can’t wait to see what happens next.

Do you have some cyberspace news that you’d like to see in the EMS roundup? Shoot me an e-mail or write a comment below. I’d love to hear about it.

See you all in March,

Steve